Press Releases

Addiction publishes press releases throughout the year. Please see the date-sorted list below.  


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2020 Press Releases

Cannabis Use Appears to Encourage, Not Replace, Non-medical Opioid Use

A study published in the scientific journal Addiction suggests that, contrary to what some are claiming, people in the US may not be substituting cannabis for opioids.

How to Strengthen New Zealand’s Proposed Cannabis Legalisation and Control Bill

Two drug policy experts have identified gaps and challenges in New Zealand’s proposal for legalizing recreational cannabis. In advance of a widely-watched national referendum vote to be held this September, Associate Professor Chris Wilkins and Dr. Marta Rychert of Massey University argue in the pages of Addiction that New Zealand’s Cannabis Legislation and Control Bill (CLCB) needs to be strengthened in two critical areas.

New study supports the safety of varenicline

A real-world study of over 600,000 adult participants without a history of depression has found that the stop-smoking medication varenicline does not appear to be associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular or neuropsychiatric hospitalization compared with nicotine replacement therapy (NRT).

New study supports Allen Carr’s Easyway (ACE) method to quit smoking

The largest and most authoritative research trial of its kind testing the Allen Carr’s Easyway (ACE) method of quitting smoking has detected no difference in success rates between ACE and a specialist stop smoking service in the UK.

Daily users account for over 80% of all cannabis consumed in Australia

In Australia between 2007 and 2016, 81% to 85% of all cannabis was consumed by the 16% of all Australian cannabis users who used daily. Weekly users and daily users together accounted for an estimated 98% of all cannabis consumed in Australia between 2007 and 2016.

New study finds eight percent of Chinese men are problem drinkers

A new large study of Chinese adults has found that eight percent of men in China are problem drinkers, and that problem drinking is more prevalent among men of lower socio-economic status and in rural areas.

Smokers in England have become less dependent but also less motivated to stop

A 10-year study led by researchers at UCL of 41,610 smokers in England has found that smokers today show fewer signs of dependence than a decade ago but are less inclined to try to stop smoking.

2019 Press Releases

E-cigarettes may help more than 50,000 smokers to stop smoking in England each year

A new study published today by the scientific journal Addiction found a positive link between the number of people in England giving up smoking when using e-cigarettes to try and quit.

GPs stopped giving alcohol advice to patients when they stopped being paid to do so

When the Department of Health (England) introduced financial incentives to encourage GPs to talk to patients about their drinking, there was a small, gradual increase in screening and the provision of alcohol advice. When the incentives stopped in 2015, rates of screening and advice-giving decreased immediately, and have stayed low ever since.

Tobacco-21 laws can lower smoking prevalence in the 18-20 age group

A new study found that raising the legal age of sale of cigarettes from 18 to 21 in the U.S. was associated with a 39% reduction in the odds of regular smoking in 18- to 20-year-olds who had experimented with cigarettes. The reduction was 50% in those with close friends who smoked at 16.

One in ten UK hospital inpatients is alcohol dependent

A new review of evidence from the UK has found high levels of alcohol dependence among hospital inpatients. The researchers estimate one in five patients in the UK hospital system uses alcohol harmfully, and one in ten is alcohol dependent.

Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder prevalence is very high in susceptible groups worldwide

Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) is 10 to 40 times higher in certain susceptible groups than the general population, including children in care, people in correctional services or special education services, Aboriginal populations, and people using specialized clinical services.

Payments to physicians may increase opioid prescribing

US doctors who receive direct payments from opioid manufacturers tend to prescribe more opioids than doctors who receive no such payments, according to new research published by Addiction.

2018 Press Releases

US housing subsidy may improve adolescent girls' binge drinking but worsen boys'

A housing subsidy treatment that enables low-income families in US cities to move from public to private housing appears to reduce adolescent girls’ binge drinking but increase adolescent boys’ binge drinking. The reasons for these differential gender effects are not yet clear.

US juveniles with conduct problems face high risk of premature death

This prospective study of more than 3700 US juveniles discovered that the connection between conduct disorder and risk of early death appears to exist even when other contributing factors such as sex, ethnicity, familial factors, and substance use are removed.