Published since 1884 by the Society for the Study of Addiction.
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Press Release Archive

E-cigarettes are estimated to have helped 16,000-22,000 smokers in England to quit in 2014

01 March 2016

Researchers from University College London estimate that use of e-cigarettes produced 16K-22K additional long-term quitters in England in 2014.1 A long-term quitter is someone who has not smoked for at least one year.

How to measure nicotine delivery from e-cigarettes

22 February 2016

New protocol anticipates the EU Tobacco Products Directive, taking effect May 2016

Smokers with depression try to quit more often but find it harder

18 February 2016

People diagnosed with depression are about twice as likely to smoke as the general population. A survey of 6811 participants from Australia, Canada, the United Kingdom, and the USA, published today in the scientific journal Addiction, found that although depressed smokers tried to quit smoking more often than other smokers, they were more likely to return to smoking within a month. This tendency seemed to be stronger for women than men.

Improvised Naloxone Nasal Sprays Lack Evidence of Absorption and Effect

04 February 2016

As the US FDA approves nasal Narcan, researchers at Britain's National Addiction Centre warn against using poorly-tested drug delivery systems

New study finds financial incentives to help pregnant women stop smoking are highly cost-effective

12 November 2015

The scientific journal Addiction has today published the first cost-effectiveness analysis of financial incentives to help pregnant women stop smoking. The report found that financial incentives are highly cost-effective, with an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of £482 ($734) per quality-adjusted life year (QALY), which is well below recommended thresholds in high income countries.

The alcohol industry is not meeting its'Responsibility Deal' labelling pledges

16 October 2015

A new study from the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, published online today in the journal Addiction, has found that the signatories to the Public Health Responsibility Deal alcohol labelling pledge are not fully meeting their pledge. Labelling information frequently falls short of best practice, with fonts and logos smaller than would be accepted on other products with health effects.

The drug situation in Europe: Opioid misuse continues to dominate the picture

01 October 2015

The European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction (EMCDDA) produces an annual report of the latest data available on drug demand and drug supply in all 28 EU Member States plus Norway and Turkey, available at http://www.emcdda.europa.eu/edr2015. The scientific journal Addiction has today published the EMCDDA's summary of the most important findings from that report.

UK drinking guidelines are a poor fit with Britain's heavy drinking habits

05 August 2015

The UK government's current alcohol guidelines are unrealistic and largely ignored because they have little relevance to people's drinking habits, according to a new report by the Sheffield Alcohol Research Group (SARG) in collaboration with the University of Stirling.

Every country in the world can afford to support its smokers to stop

30 July 2015

That is the conclusion of a major new review, written by leading world experts and published in the medical journal, Addiction. The review examined a wide range of measures that healthcare systems in different countries can adopt to help smokers to stop. It reviewed how effective they are and how much they cost, and offers a new tool to help governments and healthcare administrators calculate the cost - and affordability1 - of stop smoking treatments.

Progressively reducing the nicotine content of cigarettes may not lead smokers to quit

22 July 2015

New research published today in the scientific journal Addiction shows that simply reducing the nicotine content of cigarettes may not be enough to eliminate smoking dependence.